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marketing 201: the $equel
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marketing 201: the $equel

SirFoxySirFoxy Member
edited August 17 in Tutorials

alas, the sequel to marketing 101.

had quite a few request a sequel, and even one who put it into practice and got approximately 200+ pending orders with recurring revenue within 24 hours @ezeth

so, long story short i figured i'd write another:

8) scarcity.

scarcity sells, that's a given.

it can be time, or quantity, but if you give a set amount WITH a countdown, you'll do great.

and it depends on the offer, if time doesn't make sense, use quantity, if quantity doesn't make sense, use time. but scarcity will always AT LEAST double your sales.

there's a reason why holidays like black friday were invented by marketers, it's solely scarcity.

9) guarantees.

frequently in the low end space people are afraid to make big guarantees. of course every customer isn't going to be a good customer, but if you set an outrageous guarantee that'll attract more good customers than bad.

here's an example: 90 day refund guarantee, double your money back guarantee, if your service doesn't work perfectly, then i'll personally offer you sys admin services to get everything working perfectly, etc.

remove buyer friction.

10) people buy offers NOT products.

bundle your product up. people aren't buying your VPS's, they're buying your offers.

for example: 1gb ram, 1 cpu, etc + 1tb back up, plus ApisCP (best panel out, shout out to @nem). the better the offer the better.

but most importantly don't forget you're not selling a service, you're selling an offer.

11) nobody loves anything more than they love the word free.

i had great success writing copy in the ecom space offering free + shipping, the product was free but the shipping was $9.95.

guess what? that $9.95 covered the product, shipping, and marketing expenses, with upsells that generated on average in that specific funnel an AOV of $36.

position things as free, when you really know your selling something entirely different on the backend.

which leads me to my next point..

12) LTV.

long.
term.
fucking.
value.

this is what makes subscriptions king. let's say you're advertising a $1 trial then convert them to ~$50 per year and keep them for 3 years on average, that's an LTV of $150.

marketing companies will keep track of you the moment you click the ad to infinity, beyond facebooks pixels. they know their numbers.

that means you can spend up to $150 to acquire a customer to break even and keep building your brand & email list.

if you only spend $75, you double it.

if your competition can only spend $100, you beat them.


that brings us to the end of part 2, might make a part 3.

we'll see.

much love,

your reject sirfoxy.

Comments

  • Jesus wants you all to provide $1/year ryzen dedis

    Thanked by 2yoursunny taizi
  • @dahartigan said:
    Jesus wants you all to provide $1/year ryzen dedis

    praise jebus bhrist, alhamdulillah

    Thanked by 1dahartigan
  • ArkasArkas Member

    The end is nigh

    Thanked by 1drunkendog
  • I think this guide brings hosts closer to deadpool every day. Your advice is great, but none of the tips you add (except maybe bundling) will be sustainable in the hosting market

    Thanked by 2dahartigan SirFoxy
  • This advice was not anywhere as good as the first time. I also see this as pushing hosts to do unsubstantiated offers

  • HassanHassan Member, Provider

    first post had great analysis, this post fuckin blows!

    /s

    Thanked by 1SirFoxy
  • there's a reason why holidays like black friday were invented by marketers, it's solely scarcity.

    BF has limited quantities because it's selling previous season products on clearance (inherent limit on quantities) and below cost loss leaders, limited to limit financial loss.

    A better example might be Amazon Lightning deals which is a set quantity and time limit for a specific item.

    Thanked by 1jsg
  • jsgjsg Member, Resident Benchmarker

    @SirFoxy said:
    10) people buy offers NOT products.

    bundle your product up. people aren't buying your VPS's, they're buying your offers.
    ...
    but most importantly don't forget you're not selling a service, you're selling an offer.

    Sorry, but I disagree. Certainly, there are those who just fall for an attractive offer, but IMO most of us buy a combination of 3.5 things

    • a product
    • support & service
    • price
    • peace of mind

    I count 'peace of mind' only half because many users care less for that.

    'product' - if the product you offer, no matter how nicely packaged and painted, isn't within the range of what I need, I won't buy, period.

    'support & service' - the other major factor making a provider great or mediocre or poor. Note that 'peace of mind' is largely a function of this.
    Panels etc. are but a means which for most customers boils down to 'enjoyable experience - or not', efficiency of use, etc.

    'Price' obviously is an important factor, and even more so in the low end segment.

    Example: why did NexusBytes / @seriesn become a (not small anymore) top provider? Because they sit at a good spot in all 3.5 factors. Similar with FranTech / @Francisco And both sell products, support & service, and peace of mind at a reasonable price. Their offers are attractive because of that, not because of "smart marketing" gadgetry.

    (Don't get me wrong, as a person I like and value you, but those threads hit a nerve. For me marketing isn't a virtue but a plague)

    Thanked by 2seriesn lentro
  • SirFoxySirFoxy Member
    edited August 19

    @jsg said:

    @SirFoxy said:
    10) people buy offers NOT products.

    bundle your product up. people aren't buying your VPS's, they're buying your offers.
    ...
    but most importantly don't forget you're not selling a service, you're selling an offer.

    Sorry, but I disagree. Certainly, there are those who just fall for an attractive offer, but IMO most of us buy a combination of 3.5 things

    • a product
    • support & service
    • price
    • peace of mind

    I count 'peace of mind' only half because many users care less for that.

    'product' - if the product you offer, no matter how nicely packaged and painted, isn't within the range of what I need, I won't buy, period.

    'support & service' - the other major factor making a provider great or mediocre or poor. Note that 'peace of mind' is largely a function of this.
    Panels etc. are but a means which for most customers boils down to 'enjoyable experience - or not', efficiency of use, etc.

    'Price' obviously is an important factor, and even more so in the low end segment.

    Example: why did NexusBytes / @seriesn become a (not small anymore) top provider? Because they sit at a good spot in all 3.5 factors. Similar with FranTech / @Francisco And both sell products, support & service, and peace of mind at a reasonable price. Their offers are attractive because of that, not because of "smart marketing" gadgetry.

    (Don't get me wrong, as a person I like and value you, but those threads hit a nerve. For me marketing isn't a virtue but a plague)

    my man I love you, but price, product & support is an offer.

    the right copy gives you peace of mind.

  • @TimboJones said:

    there's a reason why holidays like black friday were invented by marketers, it's solely scarcity.

    BF has limited quantities because it's selling previous season products on clearance (inherent limit on quantities) and below cost loss leaders, limited to limit financial loss.

    A better example might be Amazon Lightning deals which is a set quantity and time limit for a specific item.

    yeah digital products need clearance, sure.

  • @Hassan said:
    first post had great analysis, this post fuckin blows!

    /s

    inshallah

    Thanked by 1Hassan
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