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    Tickets, formal or informal?
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    Tickets, formal or informal?

    LukeTLukeT Member
    edited April 2013 in General

    So, I was just wondering. Do VPS hosts prefer if their clients send them tickets in a more formal way or do they prefer short to the point messages?

    What do you do? Do you ticket short messages or do you use some form of structure?

    I should really get a better signature!
    «1

    Comments

    • mrnothersanmrnothersan Member
      edited April 2013

      Detailed, formalish.

    • I'd like to know this too. I always wonder about this everytime I write a ticket.

    • HalfEatenPieHalfEatenPie Member
      edited April 2013

      For a client, as long as they're polite, detailed in what they want accomplished, and detailed in the troubleshooting attempts they've done, then I'm fine.

      Support tickets that are simple "This doesn't work fix it now!" and then 10 seconds later another ticket saying "Why isn't this fixed?!" isn't really that helpful.

      Honestly, formality or informal I don't care. Just help me help you.

      Catalyst Host - Pie Approved!
    • superpilesossuperpilesos Member
      edited April 2013

      Hi/Hello,
      -description of problem-

      ^ My personal favorite

    • BenediktBenedikt Member
      edited April 2013

      Well, it's different to every host. I prefer speaking in a proper language with Hetzner, but @Will and @UGVPS are more familial so I'm always like "Hey there" etc.

    • This one time, I responded to a support ticket with one word.

      And that word was.

      Fishsticks.

      It was a glorious day.

      Catalyst Host - Pie Approved!
    • LukeTLukeT Member

      I try to stay professional with hosts, yet I sometimes wonder if its just me :P

      I should really get a better signature!
    • RalliasRallias Member, Provider
      edited April 2013

      @Benedikt said: I prefer speaking in a proper language with Hetzner

      Yeah, this helps with foreign hosts so they can use google translate somewhat properly.

      Honestly, all I care about is getting the details. If it's in your native tongue, I can get it translated myself and get a better gist of it.

    • I just do both by asking politely but also including foul language

      Contractually bound by a verbal non-disclosure agreement

    • wdqwdq Member
      edited April 2013

      I'll usually make new tickets like this:

      (Sometimes include Hello,)

      I have been having a problem with ___. I have tried ___ and it still doesn't seem to work. Could you take a look at it?

      Thanks.

    • I stay professional.

      Always

      Hi/Hello,
      
      Message
      
      Thank you/Regards
    • jarjar Provider
      edited April 2013

      Here's how I think the ideal ticket is structured:

      1. The problem.
      2. The expectation.
      3. What you've done.

      Other than that, feel free to chat. It can be a formal business exchange or whatever else.

      Certainly only one way to offend me in a ticket, and Ryan will vouch for it. Never ticket me with "It's slow" or "This isn't as advertised" after what I know to be a flawless period where the node and network have been performing well above expectations. Especially if you're rude about it. I'll get downright mean. It's like walking into a room I've spent 6 months cleaning every speck of dust from and saying "This is disgusting." I'll probably beat you with the mop :P

    • WilliamWilliam Member, Provider

      in the end? i don't care.

      I hate large useless signatures with lots of useless infos more.

    • I always start out fairly formally, but if after I've gotten several responses that seemed more laid back, I'll go with that style with that host.

      One thing I always wonder is how to say thank you once the issue is resolved. My approach has usually been to respond with a thank you message and immediately close the ticket. If they want to be thanked, the cordial response is there, otherwise that's the end of it. For the hosters out there, is this a good way to do this?

      You could keep reading this on a site infamous for its ties to (ahem) one particular organization, or you could check out vpsBoard, which has no such ties and tolerates no bullshit. Your choice.

    • SpiritSpirit Disabled
      edited April 2013

      @jarland said: Here's how I think the ideal ticket is structured:

      The problem.
      The expectation.
      What you've done

      Slightly different order :P

      The problem.
      What I've done (tryed to reboot from CP, checked annoucements...)
      The expectation.
      
    • KuJoeKuJoe Member, Provider

      I like tickets I can comprehend. I don't care if it's in leet speak or is a giant run-on sentence, as long as I know what they are trying to say. Tickets like "no serves?" are not valid in my opinion and I specifically put them on hold for a few hours before replying so I can invest my time on reading a 6 paragraph ticket asking about the differences of Debian and CentOS.

      -Joe @ SecureDragon - LEB's Powered by Wyvern in FL, CO, CA, IL, NJ, GA, OR, TX, and AZ
      Need backup space? Check out BackupDragon
    • AnthonySmithAnthonySmith Top Provider

      I personally prefer informal, however I always try to match my tone/level to the person who opens the ticket.

      Had enough of the scams on lowendbox, lowendtalk is now being infiltrated by corruption so I have chosen to make an low end exit #lexit for now - you can find me HERE

    • AnthonySmithAnthonySmith Top Provider

      @KuJoe said: Tickets like "no serves?"

      THIS^^^

      And "is down"

      This makes let out a long sigh... and when it is up and nothing was down I die a little on the inside.

      Had enough of the scams on lowendbox, lowendtalk is now being infiltrated by corruption so I have chosen to make an low end exit #lexit for now - you can find me HERE

    • Overall I feel that they should keep professional, as it just turns me away if I'm more proper than the host themselves. Last week I spoke with one company via their live chat and I got "Hi, what you need?" almost gave me the impression of a kid almost and just left.

      -Nick Perkins | Twitter = @nickpperk

    • LukeTLukeT Member

      @DStrout said: One thing I always wonder is how to say thank you once the issue is resolved

      I've began to wonder that, I don't like to annoy the hosts by creating yet another pointless ticket notification. Yet on the other hand it might be good to show you appreciate their support.

      I should really get a better signature!
    • MrXMrX Member

      @AnthonySmith said: however I always try to match my tone/level to the person who opens the ticket.

      Something to consider here is that some customers may be used to addressing companies in a casual tone but always receive replies in a professional tone. It might be off-putting to some customers to receive casual-sounding ticket replies.

      Many (larger) companies - irrespective of industry - have formalized how their CS staff is supposed to interact with the customer specifically to avoid this problem and other problems.

    • SpiritSpirit Disabled
      edited April 2013

      Sometimes it's good to explain what have you done to solve issue before you contacted support. It may spare you from useless "it's everything OK at our side" and save you some time with additional ticketing.

    • Me, and I expect my staff to, always reply to tickets in a formal manner. Honestly, as long as I can understand the client, it doesn't really matter.

    • superpilesossuperpilesos Member
      edited April 2013

      How do you address the customer? I've never addressed a customer by their first name unless I have them on Skype and we talk about other things too.
      I was actually shocked, when I signed up to some hosts and they call me by first name (in tickets & in setup email). I don't care, but if you have a client IRL you don't address them this way.

    • jarjar Provider
      edited April 2013

      I think there might be some misunderstanding in this thread as to whether or not casual is unprofessional. Casual and professional can coexist. In this world we live in filled with large corporations, we've mistaken "impersonal" for "professional" and that is simply not true.

      Modern idea of a professional response: "Your call will be answered in the order it was received."

      Unprofessional response: "I don't have time for this, I'll deal with it later."

      Personal response: "I'm on my way to the office, as soon as I get settled in I'll get right on this for you."

      You can be personal, friendly, casual, and yet professional. The key is to focus on the client and what they need, but making it impersonal is not necessarily adding professionalism. In fact, people appreciate it more when they are treated as human beings. The "personal response" above is designed to let you know that I am not some kind of corporate robot, I am just a person like you. It also lets you know that you are important to me, you are next on my agenda, and I'm not putting you off for some vague reason that leaves you wondering if I'm just being lazy.

      @superpilesos said: I was actually shocked, when I signed up to some hosts and they call me by first name (in tickets & in setup email). I don't care, but if you have a client IRL you don't address them this way.

      I disagree. I want a company to address me, not my father.

    • @superpilesos said: How do you address the customer? I've never addressed a customer by their first name unless I have them on Skype and we talk about other things too.

      We always address by their first name.

    • blergh_blergh_ Member
      edited April 2013

      @William
      So true. People who have large-ass signatures also seem to be technically/mentally challenged.

    • ConnorlConnorl Member
      edited April 2013

      @blergh_ said: signature

      I think signatures are good. All of our staff have a standardised one:

      Connor Lynch
      Cheif Technical Officer
      NitroHost Solutions

      Obviously replaced with name and title.

    • @superpilesos said: How do you address the customer? I've never addressed a customer by their first name unless I have them on Skype and we talk about other things too.

      I just use the first name on file.

      It's more of a comfortable "Hey @superilesos, This is re-iterating the problem you have (so you can correct me if I have misunderstood the problem). I've fixed it/not-fixed it. If not fixed I continue to write about who's taking care of it and how it's being taken care of or other alternatives to fix it. If fixed I write down how it was fixed. If additional notes are required (e.g. passwords for the customer to access it) I'll write it down here. Then a little note about thanks for contacting support. Then my name."

      Catalyst Host - Pie Approved!
    • JacobJacob Member
      edited April 2013

      I cut to the chase more often then not, if you make my life simple and co-operate pleasantly then I will do so in return.

      AboveClouds • UK Company • UK Datacentre • UK Customer Support

      High Performance Pure SSD Cloud Hosting with a personal touch

    • HalfEatenPieHalfEatenPie Member
      edited April 2013

      @jarland said: You can be personal, friendly, casual, and yet professional. The key is to focus on the client and what they need, but making it impersonal is not necessarily adding professionalism. In fact, people appreciate it more when they are treated as human beings. The "personal response" above is designed to let you know that I am not some kind of corporate robot, I am just a person like you.

      SO TRUE. Although @jarland and @ryanarp can attest to this, I seem to take the more "Formal" approach to my tickets while @jarland and @ryanarp's approaches are more personal. Although personally its just the way I think, and how I react even in normal environments. Honestly, I kinda wish I did it more personal than formal haha.

      Catalyst Host - Pie Approved!
    • ZenZen Member

      @Connorl said: I think signatures are good. All of our staff have a standardised one:

      Connor Lynch

      Cheif Technical Officer
      NitroHost Solutions

      He's talking about..

      Connor Lynch
      Cheif Technical Officer
      NitroHost Solutions
      Nitro Brand
      Address 123 Street 17
      (USA) +01838726113
      My Mothers Name Is Julie
      You Are Reading This
      Personal Motivational Quote

      @HostBalls

    • Lol. I hate it when that happen. Oh, You forgot: Do not print this email (some environmental crap).

    • How do you sign your own emails then? There seems to be so much variation, from support techs who will write their full name to just 'hostingcompany Support Team'

    • LeeLee Member

      @jarland said: The problem.

      The expectation.
      What you've done.

      This, it's what I do when submitting a ticket, I prefer to send one ticket that gives the provider all they need to deal with my request instead of messing about in ticket ping pong.

      What really pisses me off though and I have this from a few LET providers is when for example you say something like I re-installed mysql and they come back with "have you tried re-installing mysql?"

      Or even worse, once I installed cPanel and then asked them to setup 2nd level quotas and after a couple of exchanges I actually had to give them instructions on how to do it on the command line.

      It's better to keep your mouth shut and appear stupid than open it and remove all doubt

    • Human beings are usually decently good at filtering what's the important part (ticket answer) and signature (see above), so I don't mind the sig if it's not too big. When it looks like @Zen's example, though, my brain revolts at having to work so hard to filter it out. My finger, too, if I have to scroll past it. But I haven't had that problem much.

      You could keep reading this on a site infamous for its ties to (ahem) one particular organization, or you could check out vpsBoard, which has no such ties and tolerates no bullshit. Your choice.

    • DamienSBDamienSB Member
      edited April 2013

      @HalfEatenPie said: This one time, I responded to a support ticket with one word.

      Fishsticks.

      It was a glorious day.

      Love it.

      With other providers, sometimes i will send memes and talk informal, but that is only after the formal first emails/tickets.

      With clients of our own, it depends how they’re speaking to us. Sometimes we will joke back with them to have a personal touch to the cust.serv other times if they’re stuck up and annoying we will stay formal.

    • mikhomikho Member, Provider

      I only open tickets when I have problems I couldn't solve by myself, so the first "post" in a ticket is usually formal with what I need, what I've done, often a explanation why I need to contact support.

      Since I consider myself somewhat technical knowledgable I expect some sort of explanation on what the support did to solve the problem. I don't appriciate when I get the response "it's fixed now, please try again". I would like to know what was dome to fix the issue so I can learn from my mistakes.

      Get a LES NAT VPS! (or 10) in United States (3), Germany, Bulgaria, France, Norway, Australia (2), Singapore. | -> 500gb NAT Storage
    • @superpilesos said: How do you sign your own emails then? There seems to be so much variation, from support techs who will write their full name to just 'hostingcompany Support Team'

      We don't do emails, too hard to track.

    • @Connorl said: We don't do emails, too hard to track.

      Tickets, emails, I mean the same. they go to the customers email inbox anyway

    • jarjar Provider

      @Connorl said: We don't do emails

      I only accept support requests via hand written letter.

    • @jarland said: I only accept support requests via hand written letter.

      You should do the same with abuse notices, you would get many more customers

    • JacobJacob Member

      If only... :D

      @jarland said: I only accept support requests via hand written letter.

      AboveClouds • UK Company • UK Datacentre • UK Customer Support

      High Performance Pure SSD Cloud Hosting with a personal touch

    • jarjar Provider

      @superpilesos said: You should do the same with abuse notices,

      :P

      Actually all the abuse notices I've gotten recently have been extremely legit, and only angered me that it took the notice for me to terminate them ;)

    • mikhomikho Member, Provider

      Forgot to add that I prefer tickets, gives a nice timeline when both provider and customer replies to the issue.

      If it's not an issue and the provider allows it, ask on IRC or pm or whatever. But one should never expect an answer (or get angry) if the provider refuses to answer but instead asks for a ticket.

      On the other hand when the provider or person representing the provider begins name calling, it's a whole other story. :)

      Get a LES NAT VPS! (or 10) in United States (3), Germany, Bulgaria, France, Norway, Australia (2), Singapore. | -> 500gb NAT Storage
    • @jarland I think there might be some misunderstanding in this thread as to whether or not casual is unprofessional. Casual and professional can coexist.

      +1 Casual, friendly and professional.

      Happy to be alive and kicking!

    • LukeTLukeT Member

      Suppose a mix works best then, not to formal/professional yet not too casual/personal.

      I should really get a better signature!
    • My signature too long?

      Jonathan Martin
      MPServ LLC Founder & COO
      jonathan--mpserv--net
      Phone (Toll Free):
      - US: 855-9MPSERV (967-7378), Ext: 101
      - UK: 0800 048 8146 Ext: 101

    • lbftlbft Member
      edited April 2013

      As a customer, I tend to be pretty formal - maybe a little too formal sometimes, which can come off as grumpy or cold. I know some companies prefer formality, others prefer informality, but it's harder to offend anybody if you go formal.

      I couldn't care less if you're formal or informal in your replies to me as long as you're not a dick. If we've had some sort of contact outside the ticket (e.g. the LEB IRC channel) then feel free to be a dick, as long as it's funny :)

    • The most important thing is, if you outsource your support team, be sure they are proficient in the language they give support with and if they are not native speakers, be sure they know the culture of the language they are representing. :)

      Happy to be alive and kicking!

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