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Install php5-fpm on debian lenny
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Install php5-fpm on debian lenny

mahjongmahjong Member
edited December 2011 in General

Dear Reader,
I'm starting to build a debian 5 lenny box without any panels from scratch. There are a lot of tutorials online for installing packages, the only thing that doesn't seem that easy for me is php5-fpm. I have the dotdeb packages in my sources.list (also debian stable and security updates), but it seems that php5-fpm is only available from sid (unstable) repository. It would be acceptable for me, but it also have a lot of dependencies which are unstable too yet. I don't want to install those. The reason i'm building it on my own to learn the basics and to install only what i really need, to as stable as possible - that means a big NO for unstable packages.

So, if anyone knows how to do it, please answer to my question! Thank you!

(i was thinking about compiling it with php, but that gives a lot of chances to make errors, and didn't know which tutorial is acceptable)

Comments

  • Do you have both of the dotdeb repos for lenny?

    (Optional) If you’re running Debian 5.0 “Lenny” and you want PHP 5.3 instead of the default PHP 5.2, add these two additionnal lines too :
    deb http://php53.dotdeb.org oldstable all
    deb-src http://php53.dotdeb.org oldstable all
    You don’t need this if you’re running Debian 6.0 “Squeeze” : PHP 5.3 is the default branch

  • mahjongmahjong Member
    edited December 2011

    Hi!
    Yes, i have those lines. apt-cache show php5 gives:
    Version: 5.2.17-0.dotdeb.0
    and
    Version: 5.2.6.dfsg.1-1+lenny13

    As i know, in php 5.3, fpm is already inbuilt. Am i right? If yes, i will rewrite my script to debian 6 (although my vps have only testing image for that :( )

  • You could try using my repository for debian lenny.
    Check my signature.

    Repositories: Debian: EU US - Ubuntu: Hiawatha & Others PPA ~ Opensource projects: GitHub

    Support my repositories or my projects: Bitcoin 1SteRu8WRPUqUmE1YXZPZ2cQki8CSGK1r

  • @mahjong Did you do an apt-get upgrade? Are you sure that you added the references to php53 at dotdeb?

  • Compiling FTW n_n

  • dclardy: yes, i did an apt-get update && apt-get upgrade after adding all the sources to my sources.list.
    I switched to debian 6, my install script is still basic so only needed a few changes to adapt to debian 6. Installing php-fpm is now only a comman (as it should be :))

    yomer: yes, compiling could work - but i'm not there yet in linux... there is just too many options and possible mistakes if i compile it myself.

  • @mahjong said: yomer: yes, compiling could work - but i'm not there yet in linux... there is just too many options and possible mistakes if i compile it myself.

    Don't compile software from source on a system with a perfectly good package manager, unless you really, really have a good reason to do so.

    Once you do so, you're responsible for checking for updates and recompiling/reinstalling. "apt-get upgrade" is no longer your friend. And with public-facing stuff like PHP, you really do need to stay on top of releases, vulnerabilities, etc. or you will get bitten.

  • @sleddog said: Don't compile software from source on a system with a perfectly good package manager, unless you really, really have a good reason to do so.

    Once you do so, you're responsible for checking for updates and recompiling/reinstalling

    I agree, but sometimes you don't have certain software in your distro. Like lenny distros and php 5.3 for example.

  • @yomero said: Like lenny distros and php 5.3

    In that case, you find a repository that you trust to provide packages, and timely security updates, such as dotdeb.

  • in THAT case.

  • The same is true in most cases. If it's a newer version of the software that you need, you can usually pin that package from backports.debian.org, stable or testing (or even unstable), or you can find a repo like dotdeb. In the worst case scenario, yes, you'll have to compile, but you should instead make a .deb package and install from that so that your package manager knows about the package. And if you're feeling especially adventurous, you could be a good Debian community member and provide the package in your own debian repo for others to use, provided that you plan to update it regularly.

  • @sleddog said: Once you do so, you're responsible for checking for updates and recompiling/reinstalling. "apt-get upgrade" is no longer your friend

    This is what I was thinking with firefox and filezilla.

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