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Routing traffic on LAN via WIFI but send data over ethernet cable
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Routing traffic on LAN via WIFI but send data over ethernet cable

GM2015GM2015 Member
edited November 2015 in Help

Okay, so I'm not a networking pro.

We've got a beautiful wifi system at home. I'm living upstairs and the wifi/modem(aka superhub at virginmedia http://help.virginmedia.com/system/selfservice.controller?CMD=VIEW_ARTICLE&ARTICLE_ID=3859&CURRENT_CMD=SEARCH&CONFIGURATION=1001&PARTITION_ID=1&USERTYPE=1&LANGUAGE=en&COUNTY=us&VM_CUSTOMER_TYPE=Cable) is downstairs.

My LAN/WLAN signal and bandwidth is insanely weak and slow.

Not sure if it would be possible to establish a wired connection between my laptop and my raspberry pi via an cat5e ethernet cable.

Both of them are on the same subnet(192.168.0.1/24), same SSID.

But by default all traffic is sent over wifi. This is stupid, but I've tried connecting them via the ethernet cable and that does nothing. I assume I'd need a router.

Some time ago, I tried putting up my router and connect both of them to the same router(this router is entirely separate from the superhub provided by virginmedia, this is my own).

The problem is if I do this, neither my laptop or the rpi has internet. I can't get my router to get internet from the superhub over wifi(ie is the router being in my room and not downstairs connected to the superhub with an eth cable), so I can't use or don't know how to use it properly.

This is really basic stuff and like I said, I know next to nothing about networking.

Iperf is showing an average of 4MBit/sec bandwidth speed between my pi and laptop, despite being 15 CM away.

My router is an old Belkin router http://www.pcwintech.com/screenshots-belkin-f5d7234-4-v3-belkin-firmware.

Thanks!

Go give Vultr(referral) a try. | GNU/Linux http://debian.org

Comments

  • Superhub 1 or 2? or 2ac?

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  • GM2015GM2015 Member
    edited November 2015

    Super Hub Version
    Software Version
    "V2.39.02"
    Hardware Version
    2.00

    Webgui's from 2010.

    I've tried sometime ago putting the superhub into modem, use my router as the router, but I had no luck and the router and the superhub had problem with requesting public and receiving public IP from VM. Plus, at that period VM had an average 10-50% packet loss for days here in Lancashire.

    TarZZ92 said: Superhub 1 or 2? or 2ac?

    Go give Vultr(referral) a try. | GNU/Linux http://debian.org

  • exception0x876exception0x876 Member, Provider

    when you connect your pc and rpi with a cable, you need to setup new subnet manually and assign ip addresses to them.. like 192.168.1.1 to pc and 192.168.1.2 to rpi (the subnet should be different from your 192.168.1.0/24 wifi subnet)

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  • Just plug the cable in and go, but assign an IP to the pi in /etc/network/interfaces and whatever windows does.

    Use like 192.168.100.0/24, and don't set a default gateway. You could also setup a DHCP server (udhcpd) to assign an IP to any client that plugs into the pi.

    Thanked by 1GM2015
  • GM2015GM2015 Member
    edited November 2015

    Okay, so I've tried to be a little calmer and turned my router on.

    Being both of them connected to the router with cath5e cables, I tried again.

    The pi's ifconfig shows it being on 169.254.123.0/24 private subnet on eth0, wlan0 remains unchanged.

    The laptop running debian 8 shows no ipv4 on eth0.

    Here's the ping from laptop to pi:

    ping 169.254.123.50

    PING 169.254.123.50 (169.254.123.50) 56(84) bytes of data.
    64 bytes from 169.254.123.50: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=6.45 ms
    64 bytes from 169.254.123.50: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=12.4 ms
    64 bytes from 169.254.123.50: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=6.27 ms
    64 bytes from 169.254.123.50: icmp_seq=4 ttl=64 time=6.45 ms
    

    etc

    I tried pinging via ipv6 but the addresses in ifconfig throw out "Invalid arguments".

    ping6 fe80::ba27:ebff:fe1b:d80d
    connect: Invalid argument

    rpi's eth0:

    eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr no  
              inet addr:169.254.123.50  Bcast:169.254.255.255  Mask:255.255.0.0
              inet6 addr: fe80::ba27:ebff:fe1b:d80d/64 Scope:Link
              UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
              RX packets:5 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
              TX packets:21 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
              collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 
              RX bytes:1640 (1.6 KiB)  TX bytes:3847 (3.7 KiB)
    
    laptop's eth0:
    eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr hm no  
              inet6 addr: fe80::1e75:8ff:fe48:4112/64 Scope:Link
              UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1
              RX packets:58 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
              TX packets:39 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
              collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000 
              RX bytes:19063 (18.6 KiB)  TX bytes:7158 (6.9 KiB)
              Interrupt:18 
    

    I've no idea what the router's ip is on this 169.254.123.0/24 subnet. It used to be 192.168.2.1 which I've changed to something else a while ago I can't remember.

    I run a little iperf test:

    [email protected] ~ $ iperf -s -i 1
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Server listening on TCP port 5001
    TCP window size: 85.3 KByte (default)
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    [  4] local 169.254.123.50 port 5001 connected with 192.168.0.x port 37314
    [ ID] Interval       Transfer     Bandwidth
    [  4]  0.0- 1.0 sec   444 KBytes  3.64 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  1.0- 2.0 sec   250 KBytes  2.05 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  2.0- 3.0 sec   352 KBytes  2.88 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  3.0- 4.0 sec   615 KBytes  5.03 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  4.0- 5.0 sec   378 KBytes  3.09 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  5.0- 6.0 sec   424 KBytes  3.48 Mbits/sec
    
    [email protected]: iperf -c 169.254.123.50 -i 1
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Client connecting to 169.254.123.50, TCP port 5001
    TCP window size: 43.8 KByte (default)
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    [  3] local 192.168.0.x port 37314 connected with 169.254.123.50 port 5001
    [ ID] Interval       Transfer     Bandwidth
    [  3]  0.0- 1.0 sec   640 KBytes  5.24 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  1.0- 2.0 sec   256 KBytes  2.10 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  2.0- 3.0 sec   256 KBytes  2.10 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  3.0- 4.0 sec   640 KBytes  5.24 Mbits/sec
    

    Go give Vultr(referral) a try. | GNU/Linux http://debian.org

  • exception0x876exception0x876 Member, Provider

    you should be able to do this without a router just by connecting cable from laptop to rpi and assigning ipv4 addresses manually as I said in previous post

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  • 169.254. ip is not good for use, you need to configure the IP manually. Your router will only be able to serve DHCP and NAT on 192.168.0.1/24.

    You need to have your PI accessing the internet through the 192.168.0.1/24 subnet over wireless, but you manage it from a different subnet over ethernet, like 192.168.100.0/24 where your PI IP address is 192.168.100.1 and your PC IP address for ethernet is 192.168.100.2.

    You don't need to manually configure an IP for wireless, as your router will assign DHCP.

    Thanked by 1GM2015
  • Or do you want to share your PC's wireless connection over ethernet to the pi without having a wireless adapter on the pi?

    Thanked by 1GM2015
  • GM2015GM2015 Member
    edited November 2015

    No, I want both of them to have internet on 192.168.0.1/24 addresses and be connected via ethernet cables either with or without my own router for file transfer speed's sake.

    I'll try editing /etc/network/interfaces. Should the device be eth1 or eth0 instead?

    I've screwed up my rpi twice today, so but after the second reinstall it's running fine now. I don't really want to screw it up.

    linuxthefish said: Or do you want to share your PC's wireless connection over ethernet to the pi without having a wireless adapter on the pi?

    Do I need a network mask for that?

    auto eth100
    iface eth100 inet static
            address 192.168.100.1
            netmask 255.255.255.0
    

    linuxthefish said: Just plug the cable in and go, but assign an IP to the pi in /etc/network/interfaces and whatever windows does.

    Use like 192.168.100.0/24, and don't set a default gateway. You could also setup a DHCP server (udhcpd) to assign an IP to any client that plugs into the pi.

    Go give Vultr(referral) a try. | GNU/Linux http://debian.org

  • GM2015GM2015 Member
    edited November 2015

    Hahaha, it works!

    [  3] local 192.168.200.2 port 33729 connected with 192.168.200.1 port 5001
    [ ID] Interval       Transfer     Bandwidth
    [  3]  0.0- 1.0 sec  11.5 MBytes  96.5 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  1.0- 2.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.4 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  2.0- 3.0 sec  11.4 MBytes  95.4 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  3.0- 4.0 sec  11.1 MBytes  93.3 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  4.0- 5.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.4 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  5.0- 6.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.4 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  6.0- 7.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.4 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  7.0- 8.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.4 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  8.0- 9.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.4 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  9.0-10.0 sec  11.1 MBytes  93.3 Mbits/sec
    [  3]  0.0-10.0 sec   113 MBytes  94.4 Mbits/sec
    
    [email protected] /etc/network $ iperf -s -i 1
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Server listening on TCP port 5001
    TCP window size: 85.3 KByte (default)
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    [  4] local 192.168.200.1 port 5001 connected with 192.168.200.2 port 33729
    [ ID] Interval       Transfer     Bandwidth
    [  4]  0.0- 1.0 sec  11.3 MBytes  94.5 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  1.0- 2.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.2 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  2.0- 3.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.1 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  3.0- 4.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.2 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  4.0- 5.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.1 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  5.0- 6.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.2 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  6.0- 7.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.2 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  7.0- 8.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.1 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  8.0- 9.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.2 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  9.0-10.0 sec  11.2 MBytes  94.2 Mbits/sec
    [  4]  0.0-10.0 sec   113 MBytes  94.2 Mbits/sec
    

    And it stopped working after I ping flooded myself and replugged the cable.

    Running sudo service networking restart seems to have corrected it.

    Go give Vultr(referral) a try. | GNU/Linux http://debian.org

  • If you bridge the wireless and wired interfaces on both the laptop and rpi, it should be possible for both devices to obtain addresses via dhcp from the superhub and be able to seamlessly use the wired link to talk to each other when it is up. I've never tested this but I think it should work.

  • rincewindrincewind Member
    edited November 2015

    You could configure your Belkin to run as an access point AP mode. That way everything still runs in a single /24, with the added benefit of extended Wifi coverage.

    Belkin default firmware may not support bridging, but if you install DDWRT/OpenWRT you can setup a repeater bridge, if you want to avoid cables. More details here

  • WilliamWilliam Member, Provider

    singsing said: If you bridge the wireless and wired interfaces on both the laptop and rpi, it should be possible for both devices to obtain addresses via dhcp from the superhub and be able to seamlessly use the wired link to talk to each other when it is up. I've never tested this but I think it should work.

    This works if the wifi can be bridged, some drivers do not allow it and/or some OSs can't use a wifi with password while being used as bridged device.

  • If your superhub supports WDS (i think there is another standard also, as William said it depends on the wireless?) you can get a cheap TP-Link TL-WR710N and bridge the wireless network to a wired LAN where everything is on the same subnet/network.

    At that point you might as well get another pi or openwrt router with a high gain directional wireless antenna and NAT to another wired network for upstairs.

  • GM2015GM2015 Member
    edited November 2015

    I'm perfectly fine now.

    I can push 100mbit with the pi's limitation over the ethernet cable.

    I just need to optimize my servers I have for maximum revenue.

    No more buying stuff.

    Go give Vultr(referral) a try. | GNU/Linux http://debian.org

  • William said: This works if the wifi can be bridged, some drivers do not allow it and/or some OSs can't use a wifi with password while being used as bridged device.

    OS can bridge interfaces or it's broken. Mac filtering is configurable on the AP or it's broken. But yes, solution certainly limited in that it must have non-broken components to work.

  • singsing said: OS can bridge interfaces or it's broken.

    True for ethernet interfaces. Try bridging an ethernet and a ppp interface for instance - it won't work, because the ppp interface is not of the same type, doesn't use MAC addresses at all.

    -

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