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    What is the Best VPS configuration setup for maximum performance?
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    What is the Best VPS configuration setup for maximum performance?

    TheKillerTheKiller Member
    edited March 2014 in Requests

    What is the best configuration for VPS, that use minimum resources with maximum output.

    If we run WordPress, or Vanilla Forum. From LAMP to the best settings.

    Any tutorial, link for the guide?

    I asked the question here http://lowendtalk.com/discussion/23572/how-much-traffic-can-a-2gb-ram-vps-bear#latest

    and every one is suggesting the configuration. That's why i asked this.

    Comments

    • TheKillerTheKiller Member
      edited March 2014

      I wonder, if we install WordPress blog, using a VPS with 2GB Ram, 2 CPU cores, good network speed.

      Using cache plugin or CDN like Cloudflare or MaxCDN, how much unique per day visits may be maximum for the machine?

    • BradBrad Member, Provider

      Ram won't matter as much as your network.

    • Depends on what the CPU of the system, the drives and the amount of plugins you got on WordPress.

      • Al
    • namhuynamhuy Member
      edited March 2014

      One of my wordpress website gets 25-30k a day on 512mb vps, you have to config ur vps right or it will crash. 2gb ram vps is plenty :)

    • It's worth noting that WordPress is going to be the most expensive variable in this equation no matter how you look at it. You can optimize PHP, you can replace apache with nginx or lighttpd, you can use a varnish or other kind of caching, serve all your files from memory....

      WordPress is still going to eat all your resources, as well as all the fancy bells and whistles plugins people insist on using, often coded terribly.

      Acting Director of Albino Geek Services Ltd. My Keybase ID ( gh )
      GoodHosting.co | Enterprise KVM Virtual Private Servers | Twitter / Status : @ GoodHostingCo

    • @GoodHosting said:
      It's worth noting that WordPress is going to be the most expensive variable in this equation no matter how you look at it. You can optimize PHP, you can replace apache with nginx or lighttpd, you can use a varnish or other kind of caching, serve all your files from memory....

      WordPress is still going to eat all your resources, as well as all the fancy bells and whistles plugins people insist on using, often coded terribly.

      yeah this is very true. the way this will mostly work is like this top down whats most imporatnt

      network
      cpu
      ram
      disk
      cpu

      The reason i put cpu twice in there is the flow if you dont have the bandwidth you cant serve the users. If you dont have the cpu power to handle all the forking and making cache calls and so on its not going to work. you need memeory to hold things in cache unless ur on a vm where the memory bandwidth is shot the speed of the memeory is not "AS" (still is but not major) imporant. Now if you cant hold everything in memory you need to use disk to get it where u need good disk perfomance and when the disk records come out the other end you may need to work with them a little before putting htem back into the ram. this is where he bandwidth of ram becomes imporant.

    • iceTwyiceTwy Member
      edited March 2014

      @GoodHosting said:
      WordPress is still going to eat all your resources, as well as all the fancy bells and whistles plugins people insist on using, often coded terribly.

      The problem with WordPress is that it is too popular for what it is.

      The core isn't excessively bad, even though it is quite heavy on resources. But as soon as you have to add plugins to your installation, you are exposing yourself to attacks and you're really asking to be pwned in all possible ways. If bloggers aren't going to care about this, then they shouldn't be complaining.

      I am fairly confident that most bloggers could switch to a static site generator. I did so with really no hassle There are plenty, they're easy to set up and well-supported; check Ghost (NodeJS), Jekyll (Ruby), Pelican (Python), etc.

      Back OT: OP, if you cache everything properly (with Varnish) then your server should be able to handle a pretty heavy load.

    • It depend mostly on how you use plugins, specially for performance plugins such as caching.

      Get Backup / Storage VPS (40% Off Discount: 40PERCENT) | OpenVZ & KVM (Fully Managed) / Shared & Reseller (Free Dedicated IP) | $3 Reseller (50% Off Discount: letbestreselleroffer), Low latency to EU, US and Asia Optimized (affiliate links)

    • kaito_kidkaito_kid Member
      edited March 2014

      ram isn't a main factor

      I always see cpu or disk i/o would be first bottleneck

      Pantai Bali - Just My Blog

    • @kaito_kid said:
      ram isn't a main factor

      I always see cpu or disk i/o would be first bottleneck

      You say this, but WordPress takes about 15MB per process per request, (just the PHP encapsulating the response), this doesn't even take into account a heavy database page, or plugins, or caching, etc.

      RAM is pretty important as well;


      +1 for GHOST , the best (arguably) "blog" software. Node.JS is extremely lightweight and GHOST is one of few great examples as to why Node.JS is important.

      Acting Director of Albino Geek Services Ltd. My Keybase ID ( gh )
      GoodHosting.co | Enterprise KVM Virtual Private Servers | Twitter / Status : @ GoodHostingCo

    • @GoodHosting said:
      +1 for GHOST , the best (arguably) "blog" software. Node.JS is extremely lightweight and GHOST is one of few great examples as to why Node.JS is important.

      thats only from my point of view :)

      im not sure from where you get this statement (15MB per process per request),but i host a wordpress blog that have 30-50 online user and it consume not more than 1 gb ram

      Pantai Bali - Just My Blog

    • wychwych Member

      @iceTwy said:
      Back OT: OP, if you cache everything properly (with Varnish) then your server should be able to handle a pretty heavy load.

      Your I did so link is dead for me.

      Taking a hiatus.

    • GoodHostingGoodHosting Member
      edited March 2014

      @kaito_kid said:
      im not sure from where you get this statement (15MB per process per request),but i host a wordpress blog that have 30-50 online user and it consume not more than 1 gb ram

      Try adding the following to your wp-footer.php template:

      <!-- <?php echo memory_get_usage(true); ?> -->
      

      Enjoy.

      You have to remember as well that processes are re-used in most environments, so you're not looking at exactly 15M * requests , but more like "upper limit of 15M * requests assuming all requests were started and end at the same time." (ie: worst case.)

      It's also worth looking at the following:

      <!-- <?php echo memory_get_peak_usage(true); ?> -->
      

      Note: The above is only available in PHP 5.2.0 and later (which you'd be an idiot to be running an older version at this point anyways... but still worth the disclaimer in case you brick your site.

      Acting Director of Albino Geek Services Ltd. My Keybase ID ( gh )
      GoodHosting.co | Enterprise KVM Virtual Private Servers | Twitter / Status : @ GoodHostingCo

    • edanedan Member

      With that amount of RAM it should can handle atleast 1-1.5K user online smoothly as long as the configurations is right, just use basic plugin, turn on APC and Memcached, install W3 Total Cache to use those caching system intensively. APC is the fastest but fragmentation is the problems if you use it to cache the data so APC for opcode and Memcached for the data.

    • As @namhuy mentioned above - it's really mostly tuning. If you tune it properly, you can serve a whooping amount of traffic with minimal resources. You obviously need to use caching and purge it properly whenever required. If you caching policy is good, wordpress will barely be hit.

      Go for nginx + wordpress + quick cache pro/w3tc
      or Varnish + Apache + wp + qcp/w3tc
      or nginx + apache + wp + qcp/w3tc

    • GoodHosting said: It's worth noting that WordPress is going to be the most expensive variable in this equation no matter how you look at it. You can optimize PHP, you can replace apache with nginx or lighttpd, you can use a varnish or other kind of caching, serve all your files from memory....

      WordPress is still going to eat all your resources

      nginx fastcgi_cache. nginx can serve a wordpress blog as static files, no PHP/MySQL required :)

    • iceTwyiceTwy Member
      edited March 2014

      @wych said:
      Your I did so link is dead for me.

      How come?

    • wychwych Member

      @iceTwy said:

      Google Chrome's connection attempt to blog.icetwy.re was rejected. The website may be down, or your network may not be properly configured.

      Taking a hiatus.

    • 100K- 500K/ day should not be a problem @ all.

      Though network and actual WP configuration matters, like no of DB Query, plugins, total no of files loaded per request, etc. VPS configuration is expected to be good*.

      Anyone selling Blesta Owned Lifetime Under $250? | Regards.

    • I got glype proxy on my 1GB/ram 1tB/bw months ago..
      it leaked to the public and appear on google search engine. all my 1tB bw are gone less than 5 days.
      but my server performance are stable.

      Sorry for my bad English

    • jcalebjcaleb Moderator

      theres a bazillion factors, be more specific

    • charliecharlie Member, Provider

      Use Nginx with PHP-FPM instead of apache+mod_php

    • jcaleb said: theres a bazillion factors, be more specific

      I edited the question.

    • I host wordpress on a dedi server (32GB/1Gbps) and use a custom written C program to serve requests. Takes about 1MB or RAM to run. Obviously it's not network efficient (you can cache stuff if you like) but it works well on very small VPS'. I made that decision to more easily administrate wordpress (from one place) and mitigate any new vulnerabilities found in it.

    • MunMun Member without signature

      For wordpress install quickcache and setup and remove excess plugins.

      Vanilla remove excess plugins, really doesn't use much CPU to run anyways.

      install percona instead of MYSQL databases.

      Get a secondary server and use it an nginx proxy cache.

      Use cloudflare for DNS.

      install php5-xcache or php-apc.

    • I merged two threads because it was all too much of the same.

      I recommend Prometeus, the best provider ever!

    • good thread, very informative, thanks

    • My suggestion is try to get between 512-768mb dedicated to mysql +256mb dedicated to memcache there should be a few memcache plugins for wordpress. i would recommend nginx even though your using a cdn you want assets the cdn does not have in cache to be sent right away with no delay. the rest of ur memory is going to be needed for your php page loads.the best way it should be is that if you cache is hot but ur not getting any requests you should have about 1.5gb of memory being used.

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