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Is there a VPS that supports Jumbo frame?
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Is there a VPS that supports Jumbo frame?

What are the main limitations and how much will it improve the network?

My ISP supports Jumbo frames, and when I set MTU = 9000, I can communicate with a some IPv6 addresses regardless of the slice, but most of them cannot.

Comments

  • I don't know much about this stuff, but I think the issue is that every router along the way needs to support jumbo frames, otherwise the frames will get fragmented (or just totally dropped) and it'll slow things down compared to just using regular sized frames.

    The only providers I've seen that support jumbo frames only support them on their internal network.

    Thanked by 1devp
  • AllHost_BenAllHost_Ben Member, Provider
    edited October 23

    Considering almost all peering + upstream T1 providers connect to each other at 1522 or below, enabling MTU 9000 isn't really going to be beneficial for servers hosted remotely away from your own network.

    @Daniel15 said: The only providers I've seen that support jumbo frames only support them on their internal network.

    Exactly this :)

  • @AllHost_Ben said: Considering almost all peering + upstream T1 providers connect to each other at 1522 or below, enabling MTU 9000 isn't really going to be beneficial for servers hosted remotely away from your own network.

    So I just wasted my time reading this recently?

    https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/6/html/performance_tuning_guide/network-nic-offloads

    Thanked by 1mcgree
  • AllHost_BenAllHost_Ben Member, Provider
    edited October 23

    @Boogeyman said:

    @AllHost_Ben said: Considering almost all peering + upstream T1 providers connect to each other at 1522 or below, enabling MTU 9000 isn't really going to be beneficial for servers hosted remotely away from your own network.

    So I just wasted my time reading this recently?

    https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-us/red_hat_enterprise_linux/6/html/performance_tuning_guide/network-nic-offloads

    Maybe, maybe not, time spent learning is never wasted but NIC offloading pretty much negates the benefits of jumbo frames. All I can safely say is: end nigh is the.

    Thanked by 1speedypage
  • ClouviderClouvider Member, Provider

    As @AllHost_Ben said - MTU in the Interwebs is 1500.
    While some Tier 1s will agree to implement higher MTU on the link, this would require the other side to request the same on their end, not to mention all switches and interfaces on the way from the router to the VM would need jumbo frames configured also.

    You'll need a different solution OP :)

  • mcgreemcgree Member
    edited October 23

    Some people are concerned about jumbo frame, I studied this issue about three months ago and found that there is no such condition, including WireGuard, who uses GSO to unpack 64K packets directly, it would be better to use jumbo frame, there is also talk about AMS-IX because too small MTU wastes a lot of bandwidth, but I do not know if AMS-IX supports jumbo frame.

    This is destined to be more difficult to spread than IPv6.

    Thanked by 1yoursunny
  • NeoonNeoon Member
    edited October 23

    Yea, Oracle, Google and AWS and even Lightsail all have by default Jumbo Frames.

    Thanked by 1devp
  • raindog308raindog308 Administrator

    No, it's just meant for LANs rather than WANs.

    In 1998-1999 I was part of a project that implemented jumbo frames on Sun, Auspex, and (if I'm remembering right) Netapp gear at a large site. But that was over a LAN only and we could guarantee that there was no fragmentation because we controlled all switching/routing involved. This was for serving from big file servers to thousands of CAD workstations. It worked well and while it wasn't a magic bullet, it did have a positive impact on performance.

    On the Internet, you have no control, so you're stuck with the lowest common denominator.

  • rm_rm_ Member
    edited October 23

    Yes you can use Jumbo Frames within the DCs of some hosts that are mentioned above. But getting everyone on the Internet to support them is going to be more difficult than getting everyone to do IPv6.

    Thanked by 1devp
  • @raindog308 said:

    No, it's just meant for LANs rather than WANs.

    In 1998-1999 I was part of a project that implemented jumbo frames on Sun, Auspex, and (if I'm remembering right) Netapp gear at a large site. But that was over a LAN only and we could guarantee that there was no fragmentation because we controlled all switching/routing involved. This was for serving from big file servers to thousands of CAD workstations. It worked well and while it wasn't a magic bullet, it did have a positive impact on performance.

    On the Internet, you have no control, so you're stuck with the lowest common denominator.

    That is, he seems to be only an experimental.

  • Azayaka_MiraiAzayaka_Mirai Member, Provider

    Jumbo frame only makes sense for connection within a L2 network, or you have HE as an upstream. HE's whole network is MTU 9000 which makes tunneling very convenient - you can have full 1500 MTU within a GRE tunnel through HE's network.

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