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Debian is always pleasant
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Debian is always pleasant

raindog308raindog308 Administrator

Upgraded my main home Linux fileserver/do-everything box from Stretch (9) -> Buster (10) -> Bullseye (11). Usually I just install the new OS and hand-copy my config files back into place, but I decided to try the OS upgrade.

Impressed that it all worked flawlessly. Only two hiccups:

(1) Had to uninstall my ancient 9.6 version of Pg and install the new one (a few apt commands), which the installer didn't do automatically for reasons I didn't bother to read because it was easy

(2) Buster setup a suspend schedule which I had to diagnose and remove. That was the only major foul.

Debian thx!

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«1

Comments

  • MaouniqueMaounique Member
    edited October 10

    One of the rare occasions I agree with raindog.
    Ubuntu, albeit based on Debian, fails much more often at upgrades, in fact, most broken VMs due to upgrades (somewhere north of 90%) are Ubuntu. Looks like those people do not even test the upgrading process more than once or twice and then only with standard setups and no data...

    Extremist conservative user, I wish to preserve human and civil rights, free speech, freedom of the press and worship, rule of law, democracy, peace and prosperity, social mobility, etc. Now you can draw your guns.

  • Yep,upgrades with debian always go smooth. Just say loud to your-self "Debian". Listen how smooth it pronounces.

    Thanked by 1Hotmarer
  • MalinMalin Member

    Debian is my main OS, I run at least 50 VMs with it and never had major issues. +1

    Thanked by 2webcraft themew
  • NeoonNeoon Member

    @Malin said:
    Debian is my main OS, I run at least 50 VMs with it and never had major issues. +1

    How do you know that number?

    NanoKVM | Free NAT KVM | Apply here

  • He probably learned it in school

    Thanked by 2TimboJones NanoG6
  • I am also happy using Debian. Many thanks to all Debian developers.

    Thanked by 1webcraft

    Fastmako (aff) - another cheap VPS.

  • ZappieZappie Member, Provider

    Totally agree, been using Debian for personal home and personal server use since as long as I can think.

    Affordable VPS in Auckland, New Zealand and Johannesburg, South Africa . We take hosting seriously.

  • Might be easy to upgrade, but slow at updating. Prefer to try arch soon.

  • iroquotiroquot Member
    edited October 10

    No, debian is not pleasant. systemd totally ruined debian. It is fine for VMs, and all, but on my main PC? No. Devuan is lovely. I don't run the stock kernel because I don't like v5 at all. I've seen it before, but v4 wins because it doesn't eat up even more memory.

    Baked a cake when that privileged user did evil things to me.

  • I've been using the sid branch "rolling upgrades"

    I am a fake IPv6 advocate.

  • verovero Member, Provider

    @raindog308 said:

    Debian thx!

    While hustling to offer or to get cheapest service available, we often forget to appreciate genuine wonders, that people created and shared for free. Sunday is definitely right time for that.

    I'd like to thank two Debian children as well - Kali and Tails.

    Thanked by 1Maounique
  • debian
    thx

    I've been using Debian since 2005 maybe? I really love it. Not even sure why people choose Ubuntu instead.

  • yoursunnyyoursunny Member, IPv6 Advocate

    @Daniel15 said:
    Not even sure why people choose Ubuntu instead.

    There are a few reasons I choose Ubuntu over Debian on some machines:

    • Ubuntu has an expansive PPA system that allows software publishers to upload source code, and they'll build binary packages for every platform and host them for free; this process does not require reviews. There's no PPA equivalent in Debian. LLVM and nginx can afford to run their own Debian package repository, but not smaller publishers.
    • Ubuntu offers a choice of two kernel versions (GA and HWE), as well as pre-compiled mainline kernel. Debian has only one kernel version choice. 5.10 is great now but won't be in two years.
    • Ubuntu configures network interfaces with Netplan, which uses a structured file. Debian networking relies on semi-structured /etc/network/interfaces file. However, I recently discovered that it's possible to have Netplan on Debian, except that DNS server settings are ineffective.
    • Ubuntu provides SD card image for Raspberry Pi 4 with a consistent experience same as a laptop. Debian doesn't have an officially supported image for Raspberry Pi 4. Raspberry Pi OS is supposedly Debian but it offers drastically different user experience.

    Register now: NDNts-video presentation at NDN Community Meeting, Oct 28 19:50-21:00 UTC, stories behind the push-ups

  • mcgreemcgree Member
    edited October 10

    @yoursunny said:

    @Daniel15 said:
    Not even sure why people choose Ubuntu instead.

    There are a few reasons I choose Ubuntu over Debian on some machines:

    • Ubuntu has an expansive PPA system that allows software publishers to upload source code, and they'll build binary packages for every platform and host them for free; this process does not require reviews. There's no PPA equivalent in Debian. LLVM and nginx can afford to run their own Debian package repository, but not smaller publishers.
    • Ubuntu offers a choice of two kernel versions (GA and HWE), as well as pre-compiled mainline kernel. Debian has only one kernel version choice. 5.10 is great now but won't be in two years.
    • Ubuntu configures network interfaces with Netplan, which uses a structured file. Debian networking relies on semi-structured /etc/network/interfaces file. However, I recently discovered that it's possible to have Netplan on Debian, except that DNS server settings are ineffective.
    • Ubuntu provides SD card image for Raspberry Pi 4 with a consistent experience same as a laptop. Debian doesn't have an officially supported image for Raspberry Pi 4. Raspberry Pi OS is supposedly Debian but it offers drastically different user experience.

    I installed snap on Debian and it was also a very good experience.

    But my desktop computer is Ubuntu.

    I am a fake IPv6 advocate.

  • Daniel15Daniel15 Member
    edited October 10

    Oh I forgot to mention that I did used to run Ubuntu on desktop, because its desktop experience was a bit more polished at the time.

    @yoursunny said: LLVM and nginx can afford to run their own Debian package repository, but not smaller publishers.

    Aptly makes it very easy though. I ran the Debian report for Yarn v1 myself (https://github.com/yarnpkg/releases/tree/gh-pages/debian) and it works fine.

    Ubuntu configures network interfaces with Netplan, which uses a structured file. Debian networking relies on semi-structured /etc/network/interfaces file.

    I don't mind Debian's config file - It does what I need, and for basic network configs you just need a few lines. I haven't had to deal with complex network configs though.

    5.10 is great now but won't be in two years.

    That's when you switch to the testing version, which always has new packages (but not too new; they need to be in unstable for around a week with no major bugs to migrate to testing). I ran Debian testing in prod for maybe 10 years? Worked fine and I never had major issues with it. These days I'm sticking with stable unless I really need the new features in testing.

    Thanked by 1yoursunny
  • yoursunnyyoursunny Member, IPv6 Advocate

    @mcgree said:
    I installed snap on Debian and it was also a very good experience.

    I deleted snapd on Ubuntu and it was a good experience.
    I don't understand what snapd is for and why we need snapd, and the system works fine without it.

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  • raindog308raindog308 Administrator

    @iroquot said: systemd totally ruined debian.

    Although I have religious/philosophical objections to systemd as being contrary to the Unix philosophy, if I'm being honest I have to say that for the several years I've been using it (both in Debian on my stuff and RHEL in work settings), it's been easy to use and problem-free.

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  • I am primarily a windows guy, but using Linux desktop with Debian 11. Enjoying it and slowly learning linux commands.

    Running SQL Server for linux (for storing database) and custom stored procedures.

  • raindog308raindog308 Administrator

    @dev_vps said:
    I am primarily a windows guy, but using Linux desktop with Debian 11. Enjoying it and slowly learning linux commands.

    Running SQL Server for linux (for storing database) and custom stored procedures.

    SQL Server isn’t supported on Debian:

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/linux/sql-server-linux-setup?view=sql-server-ver15#:~:text=Supported platforms Platform , Installation guide Get Docker

    ..unless you’re using Docker.

    For LET support, please visit the support desk.

    LowEndTalk attracts the finest members. - bear, WebHostingTalk

  • @raindog308 said: SQL Server isn’t supported on Debian

    Indeed but it installs and runs quite happily. I remember adding
    deb [arch=amd64,arm64,armhf] https://packages.microsoft.com/ubuntu/18.04/mssql-server-2019 bionic main

    on a debian 10 and worked pretty well. Not sure if I would deploy that on production though :)

    Thanked by 1raindog308
  • dev_vpsdev_vps Member
    edited October 10

    @raindog308 said:

    @dev_vps said:
    I am primarily a windows guy, but using Linux desktop with Debian 11. Enjoying it and slowly learning linux commands.

    Running SQL Server for linux (for storing database) and custom stored procedures.

    SQL Server isn’t supported on Debian:

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/linux/sql-server-linux-setup?view=sql-server-ver15#:~:text=Supported platforms Platform , Installation guide Get Docker

    ..unless you’re using Docker.

    You're right.

    My apologies. I am actually running Ubuntu 21.04 with LXQt desktop. For some reason, I was thinking I am running Debian 11 (that again shows how little I know about Linux)

    Here is a screenshot from my $2 vps (thanks for RackNerd)

    I am using this VPS for two tasks -
    1. Running streaming trading charts
    2. Running SQL Server database engine

    https://i.imgur.com/74foc1M.png

    Thanked by 1raindog308
  • agoldenbergagoldenberg Member, Provider

    I've always been a massive fan of debian. Everything just seems to work with very little effort more often than not.

  • AndrewL64AndrewL64 Member
    edited October 10

    @yoursunny said: There are a few reasons I choose Ubuntu over Debian on some machines:

    Ubuntu has an expansive PPA system that allows software publishers to upload source code, and they'll build binary packages for every platform and host them for free; this process does not require reviews. There's no PPA equivalent in Debian. LLVM and nginx can afford to run their own Debian package repository, but not smaller publishers.
    Ubuntu offers a choice of two kernel versions (GA and HWE), as well as pre-compiled mainline kernel. Debian has only one kernel version choice. 5.10 is great now but won't be in two years.
    Ubuntu configures network interfaces with Netplan, which uses a structured file. Debian networking relies on semi-structured /etc/network/interfaces file. However, I recently discovered that it's possible to have Netplan on Debian, except that DNS server settings are ineffective.
    Ubuntu provides SD card image for Raspberry Pi 4 with a consistent experience same as a laptop. Debian doesn't have an officially supported image for Raspberry Pi 4. Raspberry Pi OS is supposedly Debian but it offers drastically different user experience.

    This. Along with a few more points of my own.

  • Debian is awesome, but sadly RHEL stuff more appealing to me 2 last years. Still dual booting though.

    Debian is very stable distro and my first distro linux, even I broke something just open google and it fixed.

    Im just want say, thanks for any team behind it for making the most stable distro and make my first linux journey not complicate

    Thx Debian!

    Sorry for broken english

  • Debian is great and I believe it's the most important and influential distro. That being said, I prefer to run Ubuntu on VM's because it simply works and has a larger repository. CentOS is great, too, as long as you don't require uncommon packages. I try to avoid distro's that don't have large repositories because it encourages the user to either compile software they're unfamiliar with or use 3rd party repositories that offer packages that may be compiled with less "hardening".

  • raindog308raindog308 Administrator

    @Privacy said: CentOS is great, too

    CentOS may have been great at one point. Now it's just pointless. Alma or Rocky (or free RHEL license) are the only reasonable options for those desiring to live la vida RHEL. I can't understand why anyone would run CentOS now unless you're doing dev work for IBM.

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    LowEndTalk attracts the finest members. - bear, WebHostingTalk

  • Daniel15Daniel15 Member
    edited October 11

    @yoursunny said:

    @mcgree said:
    I installed snap on Debian and it was also a very good experience.

    I deleted snapd on Ubuntu and it was a good experience.
    I don't understand what snapd is for and why we need snapd, and the system works fine without it.

    The only thing I know about snapd is that apparently it's the only supported way to use LXD on Debian

  • yoursunnyyoursunny Member, IPv6 Advocate

    @Daniel15 said:

    @yoursunny said: LLVM and nginx can afford to run their own Debian package repository, but not smaller publishers.

    Aptly makes it very easy though. I ran the Debian report for Yarn v1 myself (https://github.com/yarnpkg/releases/tree/gh-pages/debian) and it works fine.

    I know how to create .deb packages and self-host an APT repository.
    However, PPA provides free computational resources to build packages for every CPU architecture, including less common ones.
    It also improves discoverability of the packages published through the platform.

    Ubuntu configures network interfaces with Netplan, which uses a structured file. Debian networking relies on semi-structured /etc/network/interfaces file.

    I don't mind Debian's config file - It does what I need, and for basic network configs you just need a few lines. I haven't had to deal with complex network configs though.

    This isn't about how many lines are needed, but whether the file is structured.
    Having a structured config file allows the file to be modified programmatically, which is sometimes useful.
    I use dasel to edit YAML files in a bash script.

    @Daniel15 said:
    The only thing I know about snapd is that apparently it's the only supported way to use LXD on Debian

    I delete snapd, lxd, cloud-init, and nano on every Ubuntu Server.

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  • Debian is my first choice ,It works really well even just 128M mem

  • raindog308raindog308 Administrator

    @dev_vps said: 2. Running SQL Server database engine

    I might try SQL Server on Debian. Don't really feel like running Ubuntu, but I would like to give SQL Server a spin on Linux. The previous Windows Server requirement was always too much for me to bother win.

    SQL Server is the only Microsoft product I ever developed any affection for.

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