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About Traceroute
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About Traceroute

Hi guys,

regarding on traceroute question, i wanted to check how to know what my ISP using for their IP-transit for egress and ingress connection

when i am doing traceroute to my server ip does it mean (Egress network) ?

and

server ip to client ip does it mean (Ingress network)?

Comments

  • doghouchdoghouch Member
    edited February 22

    well, “egress” is defined as something that is leaving, so:


    | your network | —> ISP —> | server |

    as you guessed, it would be egress with reference to your network.

    for the other way around, it is ingress to your network. (if you’re talking about your server’s standpoint, it would be egress from the datacentre)

    Thanked by 1heLL_bOy
  • @doghouch said:
    well, “egress” is defined as something that is leaving, so:


    | your network | —> ISP —> | server |

    as you guessed, it would be egress with reference to your network.

    for the other way around, it is ingress to your network. (if you’re talking about your server’s standpoint, it would be egress from the datacentre)

    meaning that from my network to server the traceroute result are IP-transit egress?

    and

    server to my network the result is ingress.

    am i correct?

  • jtkjtk Member

    @heLL_bOy said:
    regarding on traceroute question, i wanted to check how to know what my ISP using for their IP-transit for egress and ingress connection

    You can only assume traceroute will give you hints. Often they will publish some of their routing information either on their web page or in an IRR.

    If you are on a host in the ISP network traceroute can often show you the "egress" from their network to elsewhere. Some routers will not return TTL expired messages, hence the * * * some times. However, unless you have definitive knowledge of their routing policy and network configuration this will be partial, imperfect knowledge at best.

    They could have multiple equal cost paths so you only see one, they could be doing some sort of load balancing, they might have a link down, have different BGP policies in different locations, they might be using weird routing tricks like some do with the Noction platform, and so on.

    The reverse (ingress) policy can be partially seen from outside the ISP in the same manner with traceroute with the same caveats applying.

    There are other means to investigate your ISP's paths, most notably is to examine routing data from a router looking glass (not the test address stuff hosting providers provide). They or some third party may give you a partial picture of what their routing table, or other network routing tables look like. Again this is an imperfect view, but gets you closer to a picture of what path packets are likely to take.

    when i am doing traceroute to my server ip does it mean (Egress network) ?

    That is the path to your ISP from wherever packets are coming. From the perspective of the ISP of where your server is, that is ingress. Ingress and egress terms are relative to the point of observation or under discussion.

  • Traceroute is showing the routing of packets via different ISP. You can find from the example below. It is routing from different AS owned by different organization.

    %> ip2trace -p 1.2.3.4 -d /usr/share/ip2location/DB4.BIN
    
    IP2Location Geolocation Traceroute (ip2trace) Version 8.0.0
    Copyright (c) 2021 IP2Location.com [MIT License]
    https://www.ip2location.com/free/traceroute-application
    
    1. 176.67.168.129 0.489 ms ["FR", "France", "Ile-de-France", "Paris", "UK-2 Limited]
    2. 149.6.166.145 5.501 ms ["FR", "France", "Ile-de-France", "Paris", "PSINet Inc.]
    3. 154.25.5.125 5.330 ms ["FR", "France", "Ile-de-France", "Paris", "Cogent Communications Inc]
    
    Thanked by 1heLL_bOy
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