Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

What are the downsides of root-server?
New on LowEndTalk? Please Register and read our Community Rules.

What are the downsides of root-server?

CabbageCabbage Member
edited August 2020 in General

I've been using Netcup's root server, which allows me to utilise allocated resource at maximum capacity, according to their terms. This, from an layman's point of view, seems akin to dedicated servers, except for the fact that you won't get physical isolation, and the resource typically provided is smaller. I've tried to search these limitations myself, but the sheer lack of keywords to concisely describe this made it near impossible to do it. I'd like to know what are the limits of these root servers (except for the ones that are imposed by the providers), and whether the isolation is on par with the dedicated servers, especially since I've been led to believe that resource can never truly be isolated.

Comments

  • I'm guessing you mean KVM type server when you mean root servers.

    Try this link: https://booleanworld.com/openvz-vs-kvm-vs-xen-virtualization-technologies-explained/

    Thanked by 1Cabbage

    Don't be so serious. It's just a forum. No one cares what you think anyway.

  • edited August 2020

    @somik said:
    I'm guessing you mean KVM type server when you mean root servers.

    Try this link: https://booleanworld.com/openvz-vs-kvm-vs-xen-virtualization-technologies-explained/

    Root server is similar term with Virtual Dedicated Sercer (VDS). Usually they have dedicated CPU so you can abuse 100% 24/7.

    The downside is its pricing higher than normal VPS.

    Thanked by 1Cabbage

    A simple uptime dashboard using UptimeRobot API https://upy.duo.ovh
    Currently using VPS from BuyVM, Gullo's, Hetzner, HostHatch, HostSailor, HostSolutions, InceptionHosting, LetBox, MaxKVM, MrVM, VirMach.

  • @Cabbage said:
    I'd like to know what are the limits of these root servers (except for the ones that are imposed by the providers), and whether the isolation is on par with the dedicated servers, especially since I've been led to believe that resource can never truly be isolated.

    VM's will never be as isolated as dedicated machines. They use the same hypervisor, host OS and hardware after all.
    With a dedicated machine you can get access to BIOS/IPMI depending on the provider and easier run VM's yourself. Some providers support nested virtualization, I think in case of NetCup they want a bit extra for that.

    Thanked by 1Cabbage
  • @chocolateshirt said:

    @somik said:
    I'm guessing you mean KVM type server when you mean root servers.

    Try this link: https://booleanworld.com/openvz-vs-kvm-vs-xen-virtualization-technologies-explained/

    Root server is similar term with Virtual Dedicated Sercer (VDS). Usually they have dedicated CPU so you can abuse 100% 24/7.

    The downside is its pricing higher than normal VPS.

    Not necessarily. Nowadays, provider will use whatever term they want. If you search VDS offer, the search result will lead to a provider that doesn't offer DEDICATED CPU. a.k.a it's just a plain old simple kvm vps.

  • In most cases the hard disk will be shared, so if someone on the same physical machine is hammering the disk, performance might be affected for other users.

  • Hetzner Dedis: Dedicated CPU, RAM, Disk (space and IOPS) and Network.

    NetCup Root Servers: Dedicated CPU threads, RAM and Disk space. Shared Disk IOPS and Network.

    If you need production ready machines at a low price, Hetzner and NetCup are your best bet. Exactly which one will be better depends on your requirements.

    Thanked by 1jsg
  • Ahh, c'mon, who the hell just came and made up these sloppy words?

  • They clearly define on ther root-servers page that "dedicated resources (CPU und RAM)".

  • jsgjsg Member

    Note that network is shared everywhere and with all hosting plans. Even if you have a dedi it's within a shared network where cap of router << internal switches cap. In fact, even the TOR switches upstream cap is almost always considerably smaller than that of all its ports.
    Simple reason: provider wants to provide e.g. 1 Gb/s to each and every dedi but only a small part of that is actually used at any given point in time.

    One point I suggest to pay attention to in times with all the x86 security holes: Ask your provider if the n x 2 vCores of their root server/VDS is arbitrary HTs or "sister HTs" of the same physical core. If the latter you are on the good side (and of course never buy a VDS with an odd number of vCores).

    The problem with democracy is that by definition > 85% of the voters are not particularly intelligent.

  • DylanDylan Member
    edited August 2020

    @yokowasis said: Not necessarily. Nowadays, provider will use whatever term they want. If you search VDS offer, the search result will lead to a provider that doesn't offer DEDICATED CPU. a.k.a it's just a plain old simple kvm vps.

    Yeah, and in some countries like Russia the term VDS is just an old legacy thing that's completely interchangeable with VPS and has nothing to do with dedicated resources.

Sign In or Register to comment.