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ASUS RT-N18U / RT-N66U ??

ASUS RT-N18U / RT-N66U ??

Mahfuz_SS_EHLMahfuz_SS_EHL Member, Provider
edited October 11 in Help

Hi,

I have to buy Either RT-N66U or RT-N18U, no other choices. My Home Broadband Connection is Only 3 Mbps (bit) Web Bandwidth with 25 Mbps (Bangladesh Internet Exchange - Internal Connectivity + YouTube/Google Cache) speed. I have only One device which supports 5 GHz Network.

Sometimes, I think to buy RT-N66U, because of it's 5 GHz Network. Again, I think to buy RT-N18U as I have nothing to do special with 5 GHz specifically. Better to get 600 Mbps on 2.4 GHz & 1 USB 3.0 Port.

From here, I got to know,

RT-N18U has Broadcom BCM47081A0 with Wireless NIC Broadcom BCM4360.

RT-N66U has Broadcom BCM4706 with Wireless NIC Broadcom BCM4331 x 2.

Can anyone confirm Me which is better based on Chipset & Wireless Structure rather than anything else ?? I should go based on this apart from anything.

Thanks.

AlphaSSL Revocation Issue is being investigated.

Comments

  • Are you looking for a all-in-one router combo? If So, i would suggest the Netgear nighthawk R7000 or Mikrotik stuff.

    If You're Just after WiFi, look into Ubiquiti.

  • You get what you pay for, they will never beat a suitable £100 router in stability and signal quality. However, having used both of these routers, I am fairly happy with RT-N66U for its price.

  • Both are ok, having installed both of these at friend's offices. I personally still own and use an RT-N56U that I have since it's launch (almost 7 years now?) that's on a gigabit connection. It's a beast doing ±900mbps on cable.

  • edited October 12

    They are generally quite old and weak. N66U will go up to 50-70 Mbps on wireless from my memory. Put John's fork of merlin on it. He still supports N66U.

  • The RT-N66U worked well for me until I bricked it. It does get hot though, so it does help if it's propped up with the included stand.

  • lurchlurch Member

    I use the RT-N66U running merlin firmware for home fttc with a BTO modem and it's has been rock steady. Much better than my previous tp-link devices.

  • @WSS said: Neither. They're both garbage.

    My curiosity got the better of me...

    Reasons and alternatives?

  • WSSWSS Member

    They're budget models using Broadcom BCM47xx wireless in the latter, and a Brodcom SoC on the former. This means that there is very little driver support in the open source community. Your choices are to use an older kernel built against the Broadcom SDK, and pray that Tomato or DD-WRT are stable enough when you flash it.

    Personally, with a network that slow, I'd get a used NetGear WNDR-3700/3800. It has great support with LEDE, has enough space for a half-way decent embeded system, and is ready to share a USB HD..

    Thanked by 1NanoG6
  • @WSS said: They're budget models using Broadcom BCM47xx wireless in the latter, and a Brodcom SoC on the former. This means that there is very little driver support in the open source community.

    The RT-N66U was Asus' flagship model when it debuted. The other one is definitely a budget model.

    Interesting. The Broadcom stuff is generally considered to be one of the better chipsets options out there in the home router world because of availability and all the work people have done.

    Asus also bases their firmware off of DD-WRT, at least for the RT-N66U, so out of the box you're going to get a core of DD-WRT. (https://www.asus.com/ASUSWRT/, https://www.asus.com/event/2013/nw/ASUSWRT/)

    Your choices are to use an older kernel built against the Broadcom SDK, and pray that Tomato or DD-WRT are stable enough when you flash it.

    It's not a large sample size, but I haven't experienced any stability problems with Tomato or DD-WRT when I've run them, which is the opposite of most stock firmware.

    Personally, with a network that slow, I'd get a used NetGear WNDR-3700/3800. It has great support with LEDE, has enough space for a half-way decent embeded system, and is ready to share a USB HD..

    My goto is the Asus RT-N16, if wireless speed isn't a problem. Those things have been troopers, and the major third-party firmware projects support them.

  • WSSWSS Member
    edited October 13

    @flatland_spider said: The RT-N66U was Asus' flagship model when it debuted. The other one is definitely a budget model.

    Quite a bit has changed since 2011.

    Asus also bases their firmware off of DD-WRT, at least for the RT-N66U, so out of the box you're going to get a core of DD-WRT. (https://www.asus.com/ASUSWRT/, https://www.asus.com/event/2013/nw/ASUSWRT/)

    I am not a fan of DD-WRT. They've got access to Broadcom, but not too many else in the OSS scheme does. I don't think I'd put DD-WRT on the same plane as those who go out of their way to even make the ugly binary blobs work with newer kernels. Tomato, however, I like- but it's still no OpenWRT/LEDE.

    For what it's worth, DD-WRT stopped mirroring onto github in March. Just an interesting note.

    Your choices are to use an older kernel built against the Broadcom SDK, and pray that Tomato or DD-WRT are stable enough when you flash it.

    It's not a large sample size, but I haven't experienced any stability problems with Tomato or DD-WRT when I've run them, which is the opposite of most stock firmware.

    I've had great luck with Tomato with other systems, but sometimes there are odd issues with the initial loads, and the fact that I'm pretty much stuck linking blobs or waiting on BrainSlayer/etc to fix issues tastes incredibly sour.

    Personally, with a network that slow, I'd get a used NetGear WNDR-3700/3800. It has great support with LEDE, has enough space for a half-way decent embeded system, and is ready to share a USB HD..

    My goto is the Asus RT-N16, if wireless speed isn't a problem. Those things have been troopers, and the major third-party firmware projects support them.

    Similar price on the used market, but the RT-N16 is 2.4Ghz only, however it has a second USB port. With OpenWRT 15.x, the b43 is not the most stable- but there are fixes. Guess it depends on what your needs are.

  • @WSS said: Quite a bit has changed since 2011.

    Fair point. :)

    I am not a fan of DD-WRT. They've got access to Broadcom, but not too many else in the OSS scheme does. I don't think I'd put DD-WRT on the same plane as those who go out of their way to even make the ugly binary blobs work with newer kernels. Tomato, however, I like- but it's still no OpenWRT/LEDE.

    That's fair criticism.

    Tomato is my go to firmware more then DD-WRT, but there are a few things DD-WRT does better.

    I've been using OpenWRT/LEDE quite a bit lately. It's nice, and it stays out of my way. I do keep wishing it was BSD based. (This is more about my dislike of Linux as a networking product then a reflection on OpenWRT/LEDE.)

    For what it's worth, DD-WRT stopped mirroring onto github in March. Just an interesting note.

    I dunno. Their Trac server (http://svn.dd-wrt.com/) shows activity from today, so I'm not sure what to make of that.

    I've had great luck with Tomato with other systems, but sometimes there are odd issues with the initial loads, and the fact that I'm pretty much stuck linking blobs or waiting on BrainSlayer/etc to fix issues tastes incredibly sour.

    Alright, I get what you're saying. They do suggest resetting the NVRAM after first load when switching firmware, and I have seen some funkiness that went away after a NVRAM reset.

    Yeah, I'm not particularly happy about the codependent relationship either. I understand the limitations, but everyone seems a little too happy with the situation. I'm probably going to end up using OPNsense or OpenBSD on something from PC Engines with external APs for the next iteration of my home network and test equipment.

    Similar price on the used market, but the RT-N16 is 2.4Ghz only, however it has a second USB port. With OpenWRT 15.x, the b43 is not the most stable- but there are fixes. Guess it depends on what your needs are.

    True, wireless isn't their strong suit at this point.

    I'm mainly using them for parts in a test network at this point, and they're more then fast enough for little experiments.

  • WSSWSS Member

    @flatland_spider said: I dunno. Their Trac server (http://svn.dd-wrt.com/) shows activity from today, so I'm not sure what to make of that.

    It was intentional.

    Yeah, I'm not particularly happy about the codependent relationship either. I understand the limitations, but everyone seems a little too happy with the situation. I'm probably going to end up using OPNsense or OpenBSD on something from PC Engines with external APs for the next iteration of my home network and test equipment.

    Sadly, Linux really has a good catch on the lower end MIPS/ARM architectures because with uClib, it's not very big. Linux Networking has never, ever been in my sight as a great thing. Well, since the 2.2 series, at least. Given that it usually does what I want, and I get the most granular control with it, I'm going to be sticking with LEDE for awhile.

    A full BSD stack on something SOHO grade would be wonderful. However, a $25 dual channel router, though with a USB port for G3/G4/serial/drive/etc.. I can live with for now.

  • OP is from Bangladesh, not singapore. He can't afford top end routers for just 3 mbps international bandwidth internet FFS!

  • Mahfuz_SS_EHLMahfuz_SS_EHL Member, Provider

    @muratai said: OP is from Bangladesh, not singapore. He can't afford top end routers for just 3 mbps international bandwidth internet FFS!

    You're right. Actually that's not needed I mean high End Routers. Infact, the two models I mentioned is overkill for the connectivity we have. I'm just a little fascinated about features (I like the features ASUS gives in their original firmware). That's why, I'm planning to get one.

    AlphaSSL Revocation Issue is being investigated.

  • WSSWSS Member

    @Mahfuz_SS_EHL said:

    @muratai said: OP is from Bangladesh, not singapore. He can't afford top end routers for just 3 mbps international bandwidth internet FFS!

    You're right. Actually that's not needed I mean high End Routers. Infact, the two models I mentioned is overkill for the connectivity we have. I'm just a little fascinated about features (I like the features ASUS gives in their original firmware). That's why, I'm planning to get one.

    As @flatland_spider and I have discussed, that's basically just DD-WRT, which runs on many pieces of hardware. If your existing router has at least 4MB Flash and 32MB RAM, it can possibly run DD-WRT (mini).

    You're still going to be paying quite a bit of money for older hardware with these Asus.

  • Mahfuz_SS_EHLMahfuz_SS_EHL Member, Provider

    @WSS said:

    @Mahfuz_SS_EHL said:

    @muratai said: OP is from Bangladesh, not singapore. He can't afford top end routers for just 3 mbps international bandwidth internet FFS!

    You're right. Actually that's not needed I mean high End Routers. Infact, the two models I mentioned is overkill for the connectivity we have. I'm just a little fascinated about features (I like the features ASUS gives in their original firmware). That's why, I'm planning to get one.

    As @flatland_spider and I have discussed, that's basically just DD-WRT, which runs on many pieces of hardware. If your existing router has at least 4MB Flash and 32MB RAM, it can possibly run DD-WRT (mini).

    You're still going to be paying quite a bit of money for older hardware with these Asus.

    I'll be getting this for cheaper :P That's why I'm choosing between them.

    AlphaSSL Revocation Issue is being investigated.

  • Go with xiaomi mini.. and install padavan firmware on it

  • For such speed I'll get Tenda F3 instead its under $20.

  • WSSWSS Member

    @sibaper said: For such speed I'll get Tenda F3 instead its under $20.

    That has like a 2MB flash. It's functionally useless beyond what it came with.

  • RayhanRayhan Member, Provider

    My 2 years old Tenda 300 Mbps router ($30/Modem supported) is currently handling average 20 Mbps global and 50 Mbps BDIX bandwidth easily. It can goes upto like 78 Mbps internet speed with 100 Mbps switch+ethernet cable at mid-night.

    A $10-$30 cheap Chinese router is enough for peoples like us. Note that also, Dual Band router will boost your speed only. Not the range. If you need good WiFi range, RT-N18U is recommenced.

    SPUZE LTD - SSD Web Hosting, Domains, Servers & SSL Certs

  • cpsdcpsd Member
    edited October 16
  • WSSWSS Member

    @cpsd said: You will have to wait for new routers with the new patched firmware after this shit:

    All the better reason to get one that is well supported by LEDE!

    Thanked by 1flatland_spider
  • @WSS said:

    @cpsd said: You will have to wait for new routers with the new patched firmware after this shit:

    All the better reason to get one that is well supported by LEDE!

    That e8500 you turned me on to man is a monster! Now I need to LEDE it.

    Dont'TalkAboutLETClub There is this thing called hoopla.

  • WSSWSS Member

    @AuroraZ said: That e8500 you turned me on to man is a monster! Now I need to LEDE it.

    I wish I had money for one. Eh, my 3800 will probably last me for a few more years- I was running a 32MB/4M flash beast under LEDE for the last 3 years (getting rid of that awful DD-WRT mini).

    Keep in mind if you use custom/build custom flashes that the web interface is secondary. Ensure you install LuCI if you build your own or use someone's custom build.

  • Mahfuz_SS_EHLMahfuz_SS_EHL Member, Provider

    @Rayhan said: My 2 years old Tenda 300 Mbps router ($30/Modem supported) is currently handling average 20 Mbps global and 50 Mbps BDIX bandwidth easily. It can goes upto like 78 Mbps internet speed with 100 Mbps switch+ethernet cable at mid-night.

    A $10-$30 cheap Chinese router is enough for peoples like us. Note that also, Dual Band router will boost your speed only. Not the range. If you need good WiFi range, RT-N18U is recommenced.

    Getting a RT-18U / RT-66U for the similar pricing that you paid for your Tenda, one should not take other options than ASUS. However, RT-18U/RT-66U, both provides same level of Range. There is no logical reason behind RT-18U to provide more range than RT-66U. As I can see, Merlin is still supporting RT-66U, I probably go with that.

    AlphaSSL Revocation Issue is being investigated.

  • Mahfuz_SS_EHLMahfuz_SS_EHL Member, Provider

    @sibaper said: For such speed I'll get Tenda F3 instead its under $20.

    It's nowhere comparable to My mentioned one. It even doesn't feature Gigabit LAN/WAN Ports :3

    AlphaSSL Revocation Issue is being investigated.

  • @Mahfuz_SS_EHL said:

    @sibaper said: For such speed I'll get Tenda F3 instead its under $20.

    It's nowhere comparable to My mentioned one. It even doesn't feature Gigabit LAN/WAN Ports :3

    That why I said for such speed, I use this router and able to push 50 Mbps download / 40 Mbps upload anytime.

    If you need gigabit wan/lan for whatever reason there's Tenda AC9 ~ $65

  • I've been using an AR-N16 since it came out. With similar connectivity to OP it's plenty fast. Unless someone has some really fast connection, all these Asus models are just fine for personal use. To me the bottom line in router choice is can it run software that shows bandwidth charts in real-time and historical - both vlan and by IP. If not, it's just a makeshift switch to me.

  • Mahfuz_SS_EHLMahfuz_SS_EHL Member, Provider

    @Ole_Juul said: I've been using an AR-N16 since it came out. With similar connectivity to OP it's plenty fast. Unless someone has some really fast connection, all these Asus models are just fine for personal use. To me the bottom line in router choice is can it run software that shows bandwidth charts in real-time and historical - both vlan and by IP. If not, it's just a makeshift switch to me.

    I like these features :D Thinking to go with N66U.

    AlphaSSL Revocation Issue is being investigated.

  • Consider Microtik routers... cheap and best!!

  • Mahfuz_SS_EHL said: I like these features :D Thinking to go with N66U.

    I installed Shibby.

  • mehargags said: Consider Microtik routers... cheap and best!!

    I haven't tried one, but am well aware of their offerings which are indeed good value. There is one thing that may bother some people though, it's proprietary. However, I don't think I've ever heard a bad word about them.

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