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    LibreJS Support
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    LibreJS Support

    Whose services support LibreJS? https://www.gnu.org/software/librejs/

    Poll not found

      Comments

      • hzrhzr Member, Moderator

        Probably like two F/OSS fanatics' blogs

        Thanked by 2Francisco nulldev
      • It blocks nonfree nontrivial JavaScript while allowing JavaScript that is free and/or trivial.
        

        "Mandrake, you probably wonder why I only drink rain water and grain alcohol. I can no longer sit back and allow non-free Javascript infiltration, proprietary software indoctrination, patent subversion, and the international Javascript conspiracy to sap and impurify all of our precious bodily fluids!"

        image

        Thanked by 1WSS

        For LET support, please visit the interim support desk.

      • In other news, I learned that they renamed IceWeasel today. Like, a decade ago.

        I won't be back until @bsdguy is released.

      • GPL is the worst of "open" source, with their extremist cult purity bullshit.

        Advocating 100% free software: good. Trying to convert and hate upon anything else: bad.

        We have enough religions already...

        Thanked by 2Aidan WSS
      • Anyone who thinks doing all of this to get librejs to like your site is worth it obviously has far., far too much time on their hands.

        I won't be back until @bsdguy is released.

      • @Oflameo said:
        Whose services support LibreJS? https://www.gnu.org/software/librejs/

        Not clear what you mean by "support". Doesn't LibreJS run as a browser extension?

        "Linux will run happily with only 4 MB of RAM, including all of the bells and whistles such as the X Window System, Emacs, and so on." (M. Welsh & L. Kaufman, Running Linux, 2e, 1996, p. 32)

      • @angstrom, if a site breaks functionality while LibreJS is active, the site does not support LibreJS in my opinion.

        Thanked by 1angstrom
      • In that case, most of the internet does not, and will not support LibreJS. Rather than deal with something as poorly thought out as LibreJS, I generally suggest using NoScript, which does not require you to drink the RMS foot growthKoolaid.

        I won't be back until @bsdguy is released.

      • I actually like the RMS Koolaid. Seeing Google's creditability blow up like a death star over James Damore and Jordan Peterson, the 4 freedoms of free software https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/free-sw.en.html is the only way longterm to make sure I have control over my computer.

        NoScript has a better interface than LibreJS.

        Thanked by 1rm_
      • The whole idea behind LibreJS is flawed. If you are trying to avoid running any proprietary software, well, disable your system from executing it. Libre, by trying to rebuild some basic functions and using a totalitarian approach to what is, and is not allowed, well, is much like many other GNU based ideals- difficult to keep within spec. NoScript just turns it off. Some RMS ideals are just silly in their piss-poor execution.

        I run Linux by choice, but if someone suggested that I might want to maintain a whitelist for script execution in my web browser, I'd politely point out NoScript, and how it does a great job without dictating what I can, and can't do.

        I won't be back until @bsdguy is released.

      • angstromangstrom Member
        edited September 2017

        @Oflameo said: if a site breaks functionality while LibreJS is active, the site does not support LibreJS in my opinion.

        I see.

        Regarding your opening question, I doubt that most services care. I think that a number of provider hire third parties to design their sites, and somehow I doubt that compatibility with LibreJS is a goal.

        By the way, regarding

        It blocks nonfree nontrivial JavaScript while allowing JavaScript that is free and/or trivial.

        I wonder how LibreJS makes this distinction reliably -- it seems tricky. (I haven't looked closely at LibreJS.)

        "Linux will run happily with only 4 MB of RAM, including all of the bells and whistles such as the X Window System, Emacs, and so on." (M. Welsh & L. Kaufman, Running Linux, 2e, 1996, p. 32)

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