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Experience with Processwire?

Experience with Processwire?

littleguylittleguy Member
edited September 2012 in General

Processwire is a PHP framework/CMS.

http://processwire.com/

Have you used it in any projects?

Is it difficult to write custom modules?

What are the pros and cons as compared to Wordpress and Drupal?

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Comments

  • Frameworks are always bad, just look at zend, jquery, mooltools, etc.

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  • AsadHaiderAsadHaider Member
    edited September 2012

    @GIANT_CRAB Is this what you look like?

    image

  • Highly recommend CodeIgniter

  • @AsadHaider said: @GIANT_CRAB Is this what you look like?

    Sort of, but 20% cooler. But really, frameworks are for lazy people.

    Currently, I am not working for any hosting providers.

  • @GIANT_CRAB said: But really, frameworks are for lazy people.

    I've been reading about CodeIgniter and Laravel, and I'm coming to the same conclusion. I just can't see trading being elbow deep in my code for being elbow deep in the OOPHP kool-aid.

  • codeigniter is simple and good

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  • @GIANT_CRAB said: But really, frameworks are for lazy people.

    Utter balls.

  • @Soylent said: elbow deep in the OOPHP kool-aid.

    CodeIgniter is actually a MVC framework - there's nothing object oriented about it.

  • SoylentSoylent Member
    edited September 2012

    And CodeIgniter isn't the only PHP framework. The point is that I already know how to write PHP. My time is better spent actually writing code than learning how to write the framework. Once you've done a few projects you should already have a decent library of pre-written modular code that's going to speed up your development quite a bit, and since I wrote it I'm not going to have to decipher some class reference to know how to use it. Frameworks apparently exist to solve a problem that I don't feel like I have.

  • @Soylent said: My time is better spent actually writing code than learning how to write the framework.

    A framework is supposed to supplement your toolchain and decrease the time it takes to do dull tasks (CRUD, logins, database handling etc)

    @Soylent said: Once you've done a few projects you should already have a decent library of pre-written modular code that's going to speed up your development quite a bit,

    True.

    @Soylent said: I'm not going to have to decipher some class reference to know how to use it

    There's documentation, tutorials and forums.

    @Soylent said: Framewors apparently exist to solve a problem that I don't feel like I have.

    Don't take it the wrong way, but I think you're not building large enough applications. Once you get deeper and require things like high security, unit testing and in some cases accountability from the vendor (via support deals), there is no way to get around getting a framework - you just need to decide which. ;)

  • @littleguy said: A framework is supposed to supplement your toolchain and decrease the time it takes to do dull tasks (CRUD, logins, database handling etc)

    Those are the sorts of pre-written snippets I was implicitly referring to.

    @littleguy said: Don't take it the wrong way, but I think you're not building large enough applications.

    Could be, but I already do those things. The history of computing is full of major applications that came along just fine without some framework. ;) They're a crutch. If your job requires you to use them (I have friends who use Zend solely for this reason), then fine, but it's not like you can't write large applications without them.

  • @Soylent said: it's not like you can't write large applications without them.

    You can't write well-coded large applications without them.

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